yourclub.shop is excited to SUPPORT the hallowed yachting tradition of private signals

 


Nantucket whaling captains of a later age helped keep alive the tradition of house flags. Their system by which they identified themselves to each other is well documented, if endangered. Just as kings and generals have had standards, or flags, to identify their presence, sailors of a modern day, too, should have the ability to make their vessels identified and memorialized. Display of a personal standard really comes down from a knight's shield.  In yachting, it is a hallowed tradition.

Having a private signal lends itself to all sorts of other uses – embroidered on clothing, painted on transoms & stacks, printed on notepaper and otherwise displayed to enrich the waterfront scene.  When crossed with a yacht club burgee, the burgee goes on the left when viewed.  And if crossed with two burgees, the Club goes on the left, the other club's burgee to the right, and the private signal is in the middle flying to the right.

Designing a private signal is fun. Here are some suggestions:

  • Do not make the design too fussy, as it won't "read" from a distance.Use your favorite colors; does not have to stay in the red/white/blue pallet.

  • Use either a geometric pattern or use some symbol or logo that has meaning to the family or boat name.

  • Note that the shape of a flag used as a private signal is either swallow-tailed or rectangular, while a burgee is pennant-shaped (triangular).  And US custom is that the flag be proportioned 2 units on the hoist for 3 on the fly.



    to start working on your Private Signal design

 
 

Some Private Signal Examples: 

Feen

Feen

Barrack

Barrack

Burt

Burt

 
Cadranell

Cadranell

Fifield-Whitman

Fifield-Whitman

McCausland

McCausland

 
Miller

Miller

Tremaine

Tremaine

Van Rensselaer

Van Rensselaer